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Samko Tále: Kniha o cintoríne (amharsky) - 2017
Samko Tále: Kniha o cintoríne (amharsky) - 2017



  • Pseudonym

    Samko Tále
  • Briefly about author

    Daniela Kapitáňová was born on 30 July 1956 in Komárno. She studied stage direction at the Academy of Performing Arts (DAMU) in Prague. At present she is working for Slovak Radio
    Daniela Kapitáňová was born on 30 July 1956 in Komárno. She studied stage direction at the Academy of Performing Arts (DAMU) in Prague. At present she is working for Slovak Radio as a literary editor and she lectures on creative writing at the University of Constantine the Philosopher in Nitra. She regularly contributes columns to the newspapers SME and Pravda; she also specialises in the theory of the detective genre. She lives and works in Bratislava.
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  • Works and reviews of works

    Prose

    • Poviedka ´96 (1997)
    • Kniha o cintoríne / Samko Tále’s Cemetery Book (2000)
    • Nech to zostane v rodine! / Keep It in the Family! (2005, 1.issue)
    • Vražda v Slopnej (2008, 1.issue)
    • Päť x päť / Five x Five (2011, 1.issue)
    • Samko Tále: Kniha o cintoríne (amharsky) (2017)
  • Production description

    Daniela Kapitáňová is an exception among contemporary women prose writers, if we are thinking mainly of the authors of “women’s novels”. Proof of this is her debut
    Daniela Kapitáňová is an exception among contemporary women prose writers, if we are thinking mainly of the authors of “women’s novels”. Proof of this is her debut novel Kniha o cintoríne/Samko Tále’s Cemetery Book (2000), which owes its immediate and exceptional success to its original topic and also the language of its protagonist, mentally retarded Samko Tále. His language is what characterises the main hero Samko and at the same time makes him authentic. What is exceptional about Kapitáňová’s language in this short novel is its unspoiled, unusually lively humour and wit, confirming the author’s ability not only to observe the world around her, but also to listen to it. Moreover, through her Samko Tále she also provides a vivid picture of a period in the recent past and the vices that still continue to exist in our post-Velvet Revolution society. Kapitáňová’s detective novels Nech to zostane v rodine!/Keep it in the Family (2005) and Vražda v Slopnej/Murder in Boozebury (2008) also bear the seal of originality. Their dynamic language is enhanced by wit, unobtrusive humour and a detailed and apt portrayal of the characters. One pleasant feature is the author’s tendency to offer a logical solution to the plot, giving the alert reader a chance to partake in the hunt for the perpetrator and the revelation of their identity. From this point of view Kapitáňová has no doubt been inspired by the leading exponent of the classic detective story – Agatha Christie.
    Bohuš Bodacz
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  • Translated production

    Kniha o cintoríne (2004 Czech, 2006 Swedish and French – all with the support of the LIC SLOLIA Commission; 2007 Polish and Russian; 2008 Arabic, 2010 German, 2011 English and Turkish
    Kniha o cintoríne (2004 Czech, 2006 Swedish and French – all with the support of the LIC SLOLIA Commission; 2007 Polish and Russian; 2008 Arabic, 2010 German, 2011 English and Turkish – all with the support of the LIC SLOLIA Commission)
    Nech to zostane v rodine! (2006 Czech – with the support of the LIC SLOLIA Commission)
    Vražda v Slopnej (2009 Czech – with the support of the LIC SLOLIA Commission)
    Some of her stories have been translated and published in anthologies and have also appeared in journals in Germany, Austria, the Czech Republic, Slovenia, Poland, Belarus and Hungary.
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  • Works published with support from SLOLIA

  • About author

    Kniha o cintoríne is a charmingly amusing book and it can be read just like that. The reader can relish the abundance of excellently invented or observed psychological details, apt and
    Kniha o cintoríne is a charmingly amusing book and it can be read just like that. The reader can relish the abundance of excellently invented or observed psychological details, apt and uncommon insights into and descriptions of the characters and the motley bustle of a small town in general. The stories that Samko ascribes to different people form a Schweik-like oral history of our times.
    Pavel Vilikovský
     
    The story has a certain delightful naivety and this is partly due to the inclusion of a wide range of people from the fringes of society. The book is therefore about Komárno, about everyday failures, about little pleasures and great tribulations, as well as the ludicrous nature of endeavour, about the feeling of hopelessness and being lost in the chaos of the past and present.
    Zuzana Belková
    Simple-minded Samko Tále and his remarkable testimony to our society before and after the Velvet Revolution as seen in Komárno. A masterly tragi-comic study.
     
    Lubomír Machala

    Of Daniela Kapitáňová it really cannot be said that she follows well-trodden paths. For example, rather than the conventional “exalted” genres, she is attracted to detective stories. Not the modern crime thrillers, where the emphasis is more on brutality and sex than on a solution to the crime, but the more “old-fashioned” kind where logic and wit still play an important role.
    Kornel Földvári
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  • Author about himself

    I have to confess that my lasting inspiration comes from fourth-class passenger trains... People who at the given moment have no idea that their utterances could make someone smile. I drew on
    I have to confess that my lasting inspiration comes from fourth-class passenger trains... People who at the given moment have no idea that their utterances could make someone smile. I drew on this for the manner of expression used in my book Kniha o cintoríne.
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  • Awards

    Finalist in the Anasoft litera literary competition (2006)
    Jury Award in the short story competition Poviedka ’96
  • Sample

    The First Book of the Cemetery.     In Komárno there is a Cemetery. It is very nice. It is big and spacious. It has many graves. The graves are very nice. They are laid out in
    The First Book of the Cemetery.
     
     
    In Komárno there is a Cemetery. It is very nice. It is big and spacious. It has many graves. The graves are very nice. They are laid out in rows. Or not in rows.  There are gravestones and crosses. They have names.
    People go to the Cemetery. Some go in the morning and others in the afternoon.  Some bring little rakes. Exetera.
    The Cemetery has two gates. One is for people and the other is for corpses. Corpses are dead people, and they are the ones who died. They are in the mortuary.  A mortuary is a building regarding corpses. Outside the mortuary there is a courtyard. There are often funerals in the courtyard. It is very nice.
    There are people who work at the Cemetery. They are very nice and like to help other people. They dig holes and look after them. They wear suits. The suits are very nice.  In the winter the Cemetery is cold. In the summer it is hot. In the spring the Cemetery comes to life.
    Lots of funny things and sad things can happen at the Cemetery.
    I don’t know what else to write about the Cemetery.
    It is very nice.
     
                                                                    Samko Tále. Writer.
                                                                    Komárno.

    The Second Book of the Cemetery
     
     
    This is the second time I have become a writer because I’ve already been a writer once. That time I wrote the first Book of the Cemetery. Today I have become a writer again because it’s raining and when it’s raining I can’t collect cardboard because it’s raining. But the most important thing is that my push-cart is in the workshop because my rear-view mirror has come off, and I don’t know how to fix it because you need special tools Exetera to fix it and I can’t do it because I don’t have them. My rear-view mirror has never ever come off before although I’ve had my push-cart for 28 years, because I’m hard-working and people respect me due to that.
                The workshop is on the Island and it’s got special tools. The man who fixes things with the special tools is named Ján Boš-Mojš and the funny thing about him is that every time he says his name, Ján Boš-Mojš, he doesn’t say it, he sort of sings it like this: Ján Boš-Mojš. He sings his name to a sort of Ján Boš-Mojš tune.  But apart from that he is hard-working and people respect him, because he has a son who is very ill with elypsy, and Ján Boš-Mojš has to look after him because elypsy is the sort of illness where you have to be looked after.
                His son’s name is Ján Boš-Mojš Jr.
                They are both in my Notebook, because I have three Notebooks. One is called First Names, the other one is called Last Names and the third one is called Died.  That’s where I write down everyone that I know because if I didn’t write down everyone I know, how would I know who I know,  right?
                Right.
                I’ve got Ján Boš-Mojš and Ján Boš-Mojš Jr.  down in my Last Names Notebook under the letter B and also under the letter M, because you never know what’s what and why and how.
                Exetera.


    (Translated from the Slovak by Julia Sherwood)
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